Most of these links come from the @makingthemovie Twitter stream. If you’d like to see them as they come, follow us on Twitter.

Page from Stanley Kubrick's Dr. Strangelove notebookKottke: Dr. Strangelove’s Secret Uses of Uranus – This post is about more than just the proposed titles for Dr. Strangelove. It also looks into Kubrick’s original vision for the film:

1. The story will be played for realistic comedy – which means the essentially truthful moods and attitudes will be portrayed accurately, with an occasional bizarre or super-realistic crescendo. The acting will never be so-called “comedy” acting.

2. The sets and technical details will be done realistically and carefully. We will strive for the maximum atmosphere and sense of visual reality from the sets and locations.

3. The Flying sequences will especially be presented in as vivid a manner as possible. Exciting backgrounds and special effects will be obtained.

The Verge: Making of Kubo and the Two Strings video

Medium taste.io: 30 Actors Consistently in the Best Movies – Could this be a measure of the taste of the actor, or of the actors management team?

Abe Davis Research on YouTube: Interactive Dynamic Video – I’ve posted tech like this before, where a computer registers tiny changes in a video and can amplify them. Very cool to see how it is developing.

Richard Brody in The New Yorker: “Marnie” Is the Cure for Hitchcock Mania – A nice thought-provoking essay. Marnie is certainly an odd duck of a Hitchcock film. I’m not sure Sean Connery, Alfred Hitchcock or the female screenwriter, Jay Presson Allen, took the same view of the marital rape scene that Brody finds so compelling. And if it is sexual violence that reveals the true “sick” Hitchcock, then Frenzy is probably the more revealing film. Still, the theft sequence is one of Hitchcock’s best suspense set-pieces, and that’s saying something.

Autostraddle: We Messed Up – A feminist website apologizes for Sausage Party review praising lesbian (bisexual?) taco. Much fun has been made of the vocabulary of identity displayed in this post, but I would not be surprised if this is the direction film criticism is headed. Younger audiences seem to be more interested in how identity is constructed (and deconstructed). Hollywood needs to start seeing its movies the way audiences see them.

Hollywood Reporter: What’s Behind China’s First Scary Box-Office Slump

Cracked Podcast: Movies That’d Be Way Better With One Small Change

Premium Beat: 19-Year-Old Director shoots with RED’s 8k Helium Camera

Nature: Cinema audiences vary the chemical composition of air by broadcasting scene specific emissions

YOUR WEEKLY WISDOM:
The screenwriter invents the impossible; the director makes it possible; the editor makes it credible; the studio makes it edible.